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Status: 13/08/20 08:16 Unavailable

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To help you get the most out of lessons, there are a few things to bear in mind. I am always happy to advise on any of these points to enable every pupil to reach their potential.

Regular practice
Learning a musical instrument requires practice between lessons. The amount of time will vary depending on what stage you are at, and what you are aiming to achieve. Ideally, you should practise every day, but the realities of our lifestyles can make this unrealistic for some. I will always aim to advise pupils on the appropriate amount of time to spend practising, as well as giving them guidance on the most effective ways to practise.

Your musical instument
Having a suitable instrument at home is essential for regular practice. A traditional acoustic piano is wonderful, but modern digital instruments compete well against them and are more than sufficient for most people. The range of models available is huge and can be bewildering, so I would always recommend doing your research before making a purchase.

Hiring a piano is also an option. It gives you the opportunity to try an instrument over a period of time to make sure that it is the one for you before deciding to purchase. Whether acoustic or digital, buying or renting, I can help with your decision.

Notebook
Many students find it helpful to bring a notebook to their lessons. Some prefer to write their own notes, but for many, including young pupils, I use it to write down what to focus their practice on during the week ahead. Parents also find this useful in guiding their child's practice time at home.

Be realistic
Learning any musical instrument takes time, practice, and regular lessons. The piano is no exception. It is important to understand what is realistic when thinking about your goals, and to be methodical in your approach to learning.


To help you get the most out of lessons, there are a few things to bear in mind. I am always happy to advise on any of these points to enable every pupil to reach their potential.

Regular practice
Learning a musical instrument requires practice between lessons. The amount of time will vary depending on what stage you are at, and what you are aiming to achieve. Ideally, you should practise every day, but the realities of our lifestyles can make this unrealistic for some. I will always aim to advise pupils on the appropriate amount of time to spend practising, as well as giving them guidance on the most effective ways to practise.

Your musical instument
Having a suitable instrument at home is essential for regular practice. A traditional acoustic piano is wonderful, but modern digital instruments compete well against them and are more than sufficient for most people. The range of models available is huge and can be bewildering, so I would always recommend doing your research before making a purchase.

Hiring a piano is also an option. It gives you the opportunity to try an instrument over a period of time to make sure that it is the one for you before deciding to purchase. Whether acoustic or digital, buying or renting, I can help with your decision.

Notebook
Many students find it helpful to bring a notebook to their lessons. Some prefer to write their own notes, but for many, including young pupils, I use it to write down what to focus their practice on during the week ahead. Parents also find this useful in guiding their child's practice time at home.

Be realistic
Learning any musical instrument takes time, practice, and regular lessons. The piano is no exception. It is important to understand what is realistic when thinking about your goals, and to be methodical in your approach to learning.

Copyright © 2020 Robin Padgham.

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Copyright © 2020 Robin Padgham.